The Lofts at Stehli Silk Mill

Originally built in 1897, the 11-acre Mill complex comprises six (6) distinct buildings that employed 2,100 female textile workers at its peak, and it is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the structures are three stories tall, with the main structure (bordering Martha Ave.) spanning over 900 linear feet, making it the longest building east of the Mississippi when it was constructed. The exterior elevation is characterized by a strong series of brick piers that correlate with the close beam and column spacing (7’0”OC), which produces a 300 lbs/sqft floor load capacity. Tall (9’0”) windows accentuate the façade and are woven between the piers to provide maximum ambient light, as was customary with factories of
that era.

CAM is in the process of converting this mill into 165 loft-style apartments, consisting primarily of one-bedroom units with a mix of two-bedroom units and studios, with occupancy scheduled for January 2024. Additionally, a resident clubhouse/common area is planned for the old women’s cafeteria, which is a single-story structure with a clerestory and exposed steel truss roof framing system. Ancillary structures related to the former boiler plant will be utilized to provide amenities such as a fitness center and brew pub open to the public, as well as leasable space for some smaller retail/office users. The interiors will have a combination of restored materials (ie: wood flooring) and brush blasted exposed brick walls and beams, as well as all new partitioning throughout. All new electrical service, and HVAC systems will be implemented, along with necessary low voltage systems. We take a minimalist approach to our design to allow as much of the original building features to show through. There are 1,400+ windows of all shapes, sizes & styles that CAM is replacing according to NPS guidelines.

Chesapeake Employers Insurance Co. – HQ

The Chesapeake Employers’ Insurance Headquarters renovation project fundamentally began as a major fire and water damage restoration effort, and quickly transitioned into an opportunity to retrofit two entire floors of their facility to meet the demands of the modern office culture. After a brief RFQ process, Chesapeake decided to engage CAM as a repeat client of theirs over the past 15 years. The heart of this project involved the construction of a new central break area, which functions more as a community gathering space with a variety of different seating options, food service offerings, and basic culinary equipment to assist employees who bring their own lunch. The genesis behind this space was to provide a welcoming common area amenity that employees could either utilize individually, with one another, or even with external facing clients. The architect’s goal was to make this a visually distinctive space that will impress upon every visitor and staff member who walks off the elevator into level one of the office building.

The linchpin of their concept called for replacing an old drop ceiling with multiple acoustical clouds, and leaving the rest of the structural slab exposed above. Executing this look required an extensive amount of clean-up within the former plenum, to demo extraneous low voltage wiring, bundle up active IT/data wiring within black corrugated piping, and consolidate electrical conduit runs into specific areas. CAM then sprayed the entire above ceiling area black to help any remaining MEP systems disappear from view, which helps maintain the occupant’s focus on the space in front of them.

Other elements of this job included the construction of an all-new fitness center with connected ADA restrooms/locker rooms, a massive new training room with a folding partition, a variety of small conference rooms designed for brainstorming sessions and zoom calls, and completely new finishes and systems furniture layout within the open areas on either side of the core of levels one and two. On level one, the project also involved shifting many of the building’s main support functions into more interior portions of the floorplate without natural light, etc; as a result, CAM helped create a new mail distribution room, IT support areas, copy/print rooms, and storage rooms.

Some of the most challenging facets of this project pertained to the limited working hours, given the continuously occupied nature of this facility during construction. Certain trades preferred to work off-hours to avoid disruptions to Chesapeake’s employees, and CAM facilitated the accommodation by being physically present on the jobsite for numerous evenings, weekends, and early morning meetings. CAM’s PM also wore the hat of superintendent, spending half of his day working out of the on-site office of Chesapeake’s facility manager, which facilitated immediate communication with the owner, yielded swift answers to questions, and helped approve design tweaks when beneficial to the overall project intent or schedule. CAM ensured that noise would be kept to a minimum during normal business hours, and that life safety systems were sustained over the course of the job. One tricky subtlety of the project involved preserving a large section of the existing ceiling grid on one of the floors, which forced trades to employ thoughtful integration strategies at the connection points and exercise caution for all relocation work above. Lastly, CAM was able to save the owner tens of thousands of dollars by salvaging and re-installing nearly all of the prior doors, frames, and hardware that had been removed and stored on-site during the demolition phase.

The Lofts at Pontiac Mills

 

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate, historic, textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom brand of cloth. Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex, along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and it will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

Graceland Park O’Donnell Heights EMS & Holabird Academy

Within the inner city of Baltimore, two (2) existing Elementary/Middle Schools were replaced with two (2) new duplicate zero-energy facilities, less than two miles apart from each other. The Holabird Academy has a distinct and individual exterior palette, however shares an identical footprint with Graceland Park/O’Donnell Heights EMS. CAM utilized a project management crew that had a Chief Superintendent & Senior Project Manager oversee both sites with individual project management teams at each site accordingly.

The school is equipped with student gardens, outdoor classrooms, rooftop solar labs, and vegetative roofs. Both schools were completed simultaneously, opening on-time during the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. Unique elements of this LEED Platinum certified project included the fact that these were Net Zero replacement schools with Geothermal Wells, ICF (Insulated Concrete Form) Perimeter Walls, and Solar Panels.

Via an allowance, CAM hired a firm (CMTA) that provided an integrated monitoring and building information system for the kids to learn and monitor the building, and features and performance. This occurs through a touchscreen monitor in the main lobby/atrium-mounted at an appropriate height for touching by children.

This was a multi-phased project insofar as the new buildings were completely built while maintaining continuity and use of the old structures a mere 100 feet away, and once occupancy of the new facilities took place, CAM had to remediate and demolish each of the old buildings to make way for new ballfields, playgrounds, and running tracks.

LSOP Mainstreet Renovation

The renovation to the “Main-Street” facilities at the Little Sister’s of the Poor – St. Martin’s Home campus required CAM to raise the existing roof structure within the middle of an occupied facility, and provide a new library, salon, community store, coffee shop, formal dining facility, and common areas. In addition, our team renovated all main corridors within the facility and completed a full mechanical and electrical system extension and upgrade.

In similar nature to the previous phases, the building remained occupied and fully functional throughout the project.

 

 

Pontiac Mills Commercial Space

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom textile and garments.

Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

All Saints Evangelical Lutheran Church

Nearing his retirement as Head of Procurement for Morgan State University, Churchill Wortherly became the Pastor of All Saints Lutheran Church in 2009.  A fire, originally thought to be arson but later determined to be electrical failure, severely damaged his Church and virtually destroyed the lower level offices, social hall, kitchen, restrooms, and classrooms on the lower level of the building.  The sanctuary, offices, and classrooms above suffered damage from both the fire and the firemen as they put out the blaze.  What was not burned was either broken or suffered smoke damage, precluding both worship and the pre-school that the building facilitated.

Pastor Wortherly contacted CAM Construction with whom he and his congregation had worked at Morgan State University to restore the Church building and aid them in receiving the appropriate funds from their insurance company.  CAM developed the scope of work needed for the restoration, provided pricing for each portion of the project on an individual basis, and then worked directly with the Church and their insurance company to ensure that the Church could maximize the replacement value from their policy.

The lower level social hall, which was most severely damaged by the fire, had both lead paint and vinyl asbestos tile flooring, which needed to be remediated; the heat had severely damaged the walls and ceiling, and the kitchen was a total loss.  The windows in the sanctuary had been broken out, the narthex received smoke damage, the handicap lift had been destroyed, and the ceilings and insulation throughout the complex had been contaminated by smoke.

With a very limited budget, CAM was able to completely restore the lower level, restore the wall and floor finishes at the sanctuary, provide new windows at the sanctuary, install a new elevator, provide new finishes for all of the classrooms and offices, and not only restore all the restrooms but bring them into compliance with current ADA standards.  Through the efforts of CAM and Pastor Wortherly, all insurance funds were used judiciously. Also a challenge was that the Church remained operational throughout the restoration and the replacement of the electrical service.

Very sadly, Pastor Wortherly succumbed to an illness and did not live to serve his congregation in their newly restored home; his loss added to the challenge of the project because of his personal involvement in the design and construction and his relationship with the insurance provider.  However, CAM was able to complete the project on time and within the small budget available to them.

It was Pastor Wortherly’s dream that the restored Church be “better than ever before”, and no one doubts that he is smiling down from Heaven now that the project is complete.

LSOP St. Martin’s Chapel & Postulate Renovations

Throughout CAM’s history with the Little Sisters of the Poor at St. Martin’s Home, multiple, individual, design/build projects have been constructed within the home.  One project included the completion of the design/build renovations to the Chapel, its gathering and parlor areas, and the Convent and Postulant residences.

It is important to note that all electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and fire protection work was completed and added to the existing operating systems within the home.

As with the entire project, chapel renovations included full hazardous materials abatement, removal of all but two walls within the chapel space, replacement of the existing glass panels with new handmade art glass, replacing the entry doors, and a new level five finish barrel vault ceiling was added.  All of the electrical and HVAC equipment is housed above the ceiling. Lighting is provided by 46 pendant lights, high-hat perimeter, and accent lighting. The lighting system has eight dimming zones to provide multiple configurations for the various services. The high ceiling at the perimeter of the chapel was constructed as a drywall cove that was sprayed with an acoustic treatment.

The newly constructed altar platform, with its ramped entry, consistent with the remainder of the chapel, is finished with specially selected 16”x 32” stone tile flooring. At the altar area, hand-finished plaster accent walls draw the eye to the stone-clad wall behind the crucifix. Niches for artwork and side adorations were constructed, and the arched drywall openings on either side of the altar area lead to the sacristies and celebrant’s restroom.  Included in the Chapel renovation project were the renovations to the gathering/parlor area and work to the offices adjacent to the gathering area.

Two of the many unique challenges of the project included ensuring sound attenuation for the air handling units located directly behind the altar as well as matching the marble of the liturgical furnishings, which were removed, protected, and re-installed.  The marble was finally matched by using reclaimed and re-cut materials specially fabricated for this project.

Similarly critical to the Sisters were the light level and the comfort of worshipers via the spacing of the pews.  These decisions were finalized only after visiting and documenting finished spaces in three similar chapels.

The Postulant and Convent area renovations included a total gut, hazmat abatement, and total systems replacement.  Major structural modifications to the roof allowed for a new clerestory on the second floor; new shingle and flat roofs were constructed as well.  An elevator was installed within the modified existing shaft, and new windows were also installed on both floors. Further additions include construction of the bedrooms and bathrooms for the Sisters and Postulants, a library, exercise room, laundry, refectory, pantry, offices, archival storage, and a devotional chapel within the Convent.  The simple yet detailed finishes provide the Sisters and their guests with a welcome place of respite from the round-the-clock duties serving the elderly residents.

As with each of the previous projects on this site, CAM’s work had to be scheduled so as not to interfere with the ongoing activities of the home, and to minimize disruption to the population, staff, and the Sisters themselves.

Hereford HS Renovation & Addition

This 188,000 square foot renovation and addition project was scheduled for twelve distinct phases and necessitated double shift work for over two years. The tightly scheduled project also  remained occupied throughout its duration.

Due to the complexity of the job, the aggressive schedule and the sheer acreage of the facility, CAM managed the renovation, the addition, the site work and the creation of a new pre-treatment waste water facility as four individual sub projects. Each of these sub projects had its own shifts and crews.

For nearly the entire duration of the project, the renovation required that CAM work two full shifts during all times when the school was closed to mitigate any impact to the administration and student population. The day shift proceeded form 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. while the second shift worked from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. The second shift included an entirely different workforce and superintendent who worked closely in concert with the day shift superintendent.

This twelve-phased 143,000 square foot renovation included remediation of asbestos and removal and disposal of PCB ballasts. Renovations also included demolition throughout the school, installation of all new finishes and fixtures, new casework and classroom accessories and work to the mechanical, sprinkler and electrical systems.  Tightly coordinated phasing mandated that work be completed for the students to return to the renovated classrooms in accordance with the schedule. Parts of the building were vacated during breaks which allowed for unimpeded progress in some areas.

The addition was primarily constructed during the day shift.  It consisted of a new three-story, 45,000 square foot building with a cafeteria and STEM science addition. The addition is connected to the existing building via a new enclosed second floor bridge link.  The new structural steel, brick and cast stone structure also creates the new feature entry into the school.  Upon completion of the new addition and entry, the school moved into the new spaces while the renovations and site work continued.

The addition includes a new cafeteria with a full service kitchen, pantry and serving areas, eleven new Biology classrooms, Chemistry and Physics laboratories with prep and storage rooms, restrooms, offices and circulation areas.  Science casework, shelving and fume hoods as well as extensive IT requirements differentiate these spaces from typical high school classrooms.  A new HVAC system was also installed that includes a two pipe chilled water system and boiler.

The site work on this 270 acre facility was also primarily performed during normal working hours.  Additional night shifts were incorporated during work which required tying in to the existing electrical infrastructure. Site work also included extensive grading, paving for roadways and parking lots, and the installation of utilities and drain fields.

Twelve new storm water management ponds were also installed adjacent to five athletic complexes all of which needed to remain operational throughout the school year and for scheduled recreation programs during the summers and school breaks.

The fourth sub-project represented the construction of a new waste water/pre-treatment facility. The facility has the capability of handling 10,000 gallons/day.  In addition to serving the school as a waste water treatment plant, the building also serves to house and care for livestock associated with the school’s agricultural program.

During the entire project CAM managed logistical challenges as well.  Since there was only a single entry and exit to the school and site, deliveries were tightly coordinated with the 40 school buses and student and staff vehicular traffic. Materials for the project could only be received during specific windows of time which varied with the school’s event calendar.

Despite nearly three years of continuous construction activity, major school activities including concerts, proms and athletic activities were incorporated into the schedule and proceeded without interruption.