Pontiac Mills Apartments

 

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom brand of cloth. Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

Holabird Academy

Within the inner city of Baltimore, two (2) existing Elementary/Middle Schools were replaced with two (2) new duplicate zero-energy facilities. The Holabird Academy has a distinct and individual exterior palette, however shares an identical footprint with Graceland Park/O’Donnell Heights EMS.

The school is equipped with student gardens, outdoor classrooms, rooftop solar labs, and vegetative roofs. Both schools were completed simultaneously, opening on-time during the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Graceland Park-O’Donnell Heights EMS

Within the inner city of Baltimore, two (2) existing Elementary/Middle Schools were replaced with two (2) new duplicate zero-energy facilities. Graceland Park/O’Donnell Heights EMS has a distinct and individual exterior palette, however shares an identical footprint with Holabird Academy.

The school is equipped with student gardens, outdoor classrooms, rooftop solar labs, and vegetative roofs. Both schools were completed simultaneously, opening on-time during the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic.

LSOP Mainstreet Renovation

The renovation to the “Main-Street” facilities at the Little Sister’s of the Poor – St. Martin’s Home campus required that CAM raise the existing roof structure within the middle of an occupied facility, and provide a new library, salon, community store, coffee shop, formal dining facility, and common areas. In addition, our team renovated all main corridors within the facility, and completed a full mechanical and electrical system extension and upgrade.

In similar nature to the previous phases, the building remained occupied and fully functional throughout the project.

 

 

Pontiac Mills Office & Retail

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom textile and garments.

Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

All Saints Evangelical Lutheran Church

Nearing his retirement as Head of Procurement for Morgan State University, Churchill Wortherly became the Pastor of All Saints Lutheran Church in 2009.  A fire, originally thought to be arson but later determined to be electrical failure, severely damaged his Church and virtually destroyed the lower level offices, social hall, kitchen, restrooms and classrooms on the lower level of the building.  The sanctuary, offices and classrooms above suffered damage from both the fire and the firemen as they put out the blaze.  What was not burned was either broken or suffered smoke damage precluding both worship and the pre-school which had occupied the building.

Pastor Wortherly contacted CAM Construction with whom he had worked at Morgan State University to work with him and his congregation to restore the Church building and aid them in receiving the appropriate funds from their insurance company.  CAM developed the scope of work needed for the restoration, provided pricing for each portion of the project on an individual basis and then worked directly with the Church and their insurance company to ensure that the Church could maximize the replacement value from their policy.

The lower level social hall, most severely damaged by the fire, had both lead paint and vinyl asbestos tile flooring which needed to be remediated, the heat had severely damaged the walls and ceiling and the kitchen was a total loss.  The windows in the sanctuary had been broken out, the narthex received smoke damage, the handicap lift had been destroyed and the ceilings and insulation throughout the complex had been contaminated by smoke.

With a very limited budget CAM was able to completely restore the lower level, restore the wall and floor finishes at the sanctuary, provide new windows at the sanctuary, install a new elevator, provide new finishes for all of the classrooms and offices and not only restore all the restrooms but bring them into compliance with current ADA standards.  Through the efforts of CAM and Pastor Wortherly all insurance funds were used judiciously  Also challenging is the fact that the Church remained operational throughout the restoration and the replacement of the electrical service.

Very sadly Pastor Wortherly succumbed to an illness and did not live to serve his congregation in their newly restored home.  His loss added to the challenge of the project because of his personal involvement in the design and construction and his relationship with the insurance provider.   However, CAM was able to complete the project on time, within the small budget available to them.

It was Pastor Wortherly’s dream that the restored Church be “better than ever before” and no one doubts that he is smiling down from heaven now that the project is complete.

LSOP St. Martin’s Chapel & Postulate Renovations

Throughout CAM’s  with the Little Sisters of the Poor at St. Martin’s Home, multiple, individual, design/build projects have been constructed within the home.  One project included the completion of the design/build renovations to the Chapel, its gathering and parlor areas, the Convent and Postulant residences.

It is important to note that all electrical, plumbing, HVAC and fire protection work was completed and added to the existing operating systems within the home.

As with the entire project, chapel renovations included full hazardous materials abatement, removal of all but two walls within the chapel space, replacement of the existing glass panels with new handmade art glass, replacing the entry doors, and a new level five finish barrel vault ceiling was added.  All of the electrical and HVAC equipment is housed above the ceiling. Lighting is provided by 46 pendant lights, high hat perimeter and accent lighting. The lighting system has 8 dimming zones to provide multiple configurations for the various services. The high ceiling at the perimeter of the chapel has been constructed as a drywall cove which is sprayed with an acoustic treatment.

The newly constructed altar platform with its ramped entry, consistent with the remainder of the chapel is finished with specially selected 16”x 32” stone tile flooring.  At the altar area hand finished plaster accent walls draws the eye to the stone clad wall behind the crucifix.  Niches for artwork and side adorations were constructed and the arched drywall openings on either side of the altar area lead to the sacristies and celebrant’s restroom.  Included in the Chapel renovation project was the renovations to the gathering/parlor area and work to the offices adjacent to the gathering area.

Two of the many unique challenges of the project included ensuring sound attenuation for the air handling units located directly behind the altar as well as matching the marble of the liturgical furnishings which were removed, protected and re-installed.  The marble was finally matched by using reclaimed and re-cut materials specially fabricated for this project.

Similarly, critical to the Sisters was the light level and the comfort of worshipers by the spacing of the pews.  These decisions were finalized only after visiting and documenting finished spaces in three similar chapels.

The Postulant and Convent area renovations included a total gut, hazmat abatement, and total systems replacement.  Major structural modifications to the roof allowed for a new clerestory on the second floor. New shingle and flat roofs were constructed as well.  Also installed was an elevator within the modified existing shaft, new windows on both floors, and construction of the bedrooms and bathrooms for the Sisters and Postulants, a library, exercise room, laundry, refectory, pantry, offices, archival storage, and a devotional chapel within the Convent.  The simple yet detailed finishes provide the Sisters and their guests with a welcome place of respite from the round the clock duties serving the elderly residents.

As with each of the previous projects on this site, CAM’s work had to be scheduled so as not to interfere with the ongoing activities of the home, and to minimize disruption to the population, staff and the Sisters themselves.

Hereford HS Renovation & Addition

This 188,000 square foot renovation and addition project was scheduled for twelve distinct phases and necessitated double shift work for over two years. The tightly scheduled project also  remained occupied throughout its duration.

Due to the complexity of the job, the aggressive schedule and the sheer acreage of the facility, CAM managed the renovation, the addition, the site work and the creation of a new pre-treatment waste water facility as four individual sub projects. Each of these sub projects had its own shifts and crews.

For nearly the entire duration of the project, the renovation required that CAM work two full shifts during all times when the school was closed to mitigate any impact to the administration and student population. The day shift proceeded form 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. while the second shift worked from 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. The second shift included an entirely different workforce and superintendent who worked closely in concert with the day shift superintendent.

This twelve-phased 143,000 square foot renovation included remediation of asbestos and removal and disposal of PCB ballasts. Renovations also included demolition throughout the school, installation of all new finishes and fixtures, new casework and classroom accessories and work to the mechanical, sprinkler and electrical systems.  Tightly coordinated phasing mandated that work be completed for the students to return to the renovated classrooms in accordance with the schedule. Parts of the building were vacated during breaks which allowed for unimpeded progress in some areas.

The addition was primarily constructed during the day shift.  It consisted of a new three-story, 45,000 square foot building with a cafeteria and STEM science addition. The addition is connected to the existing building via a new enclosed second floor bridge link.  The new structural steel, brick and cast stone structure also creates the new feature entry into the school.  Upon completion of the new addition and entry, the school moved into the new spaces while the renovations and site work continued.

The addition includes a new cafeteria with a full service kitchen, pantry and serving areas, eleven new Biology classrooms, Chemistry and Physics laboratories with prep and storage rooms, restrooms, offices and circulation areas.  Science casework, shelving and fume hoods as well as extensive IT requirements differentiate these spaces from typical high school classrooms.  A new HVAC system was also installed that includes a two pipe chilled water system and boiler.

The site work on this 270 acre facility was also primarily performed during normal working hours.  Additional night shifts were incorporated during work which required tying in to the existing electrical infrastructure. Site work also included extensive grading, paving for roadways and parking lots, and the installation of utilities and drain fields.

Twelve new storm water management ponds were also installed adjacent to five athletic complexes all of which needed to remain operational throughout the school year and for scheduled recreation programs during the summers and school breaks.

The fourth sub-project represented the construction of a new waste water/pre-treatment facility. The facility has the capability of handling 10,000 gallons/day.  In addition to serving the school as a waste water treatment plant, the building also serves to house and care for livestock associated with the school’s agricultural program.

During the entire project CAM managed logistical challenges as well.  Since there was only a single entry and exit to the school and site, deliveries were tightly coordinated with the 40 school buses and student and staff vehicular traffic. Materials for the project could only be received during specific windows of time which varied with the school’s event calendar.

Despite nearly three years of continuous construction activity, major school activities including concerts, proms and athletic activities were incorporated into the schedule and proceeded without interruption.

Chesapeake Employers Insurance Facility

Executives and employees at the six-story, 80,000 square foot facility had several problems. There was a severe shortage of parking spaces for their employees and guests, the interior elevators were older and deliveries needed to be brought through the lobby, the finishes and office furniture was outdated, and most importantly the HVAC system did not work properly. Specifically, the office areas above the parking garage were so cold in the winter that no one could work in the area.

IWIF employed CAM as a CM at Risk to aid them in resolving these issues, hiring a design firm and completing the construction within their occupied offices. A new 165 space parking lot was constructed adjacent the building, complete with decorative fencing, retaining walls and a remodeled entryway into the building. The new elevator was construed within a building addition that provides access for both employees and deliveries to each of the floors. The HVAC problem was alleviated by a newly designed system and installed while the building was being renovated.

The ultimate challenge to this project was that the building remained occupied throughout construction. The lobby and each floor was renovated individually and employees relocated, office furniture deliveries were coordinated to meet the floor by floor renovation, cut-throughs were made to the floors for the elevator access and the un-used first floor auditorium was converted into usable office and conference space. Complex cabinetry and millwork create an outstanding executive and board room area. All work was completed without disruption or loss of work time for the IWIF employees.