Pontiac Mills Apartments

 

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom brand of cloth. Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

The Ridge – Former Abell School

Historic restoration and an adaptive re-use project of a registered Historic property. This late nineteenth century Beaux Artes Mansion was designed by Baldwin & Pennington and was built by John Stack & Sons. Originally a twenty-eight room residence that was later turned into a school for handicapped children, CAM returned it to a private residence and won numerous awards for our efforts.

This project required removal of lead based paint and asbestos, installation of a heating and the design and installation of the home’s first air conditioning system – installed with no disruption to the historic interior fabric of the home. The project also included restoration of the plaster walls, ceilings and crown moldings, restoration of the interior shutters and a complete restoration of a two story tower, replete with brick, terra-cotta, metal cornices, lead coated copper, slate roofing, etc..

Pontiac Mills Office & Retail

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom textile and garments.

Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

Robert Poole Building

The Robert Poole Building is home to The Academy for College and Career Exploration (ACCE) and The Independence School, a project within the 21st Century School Buildings Plan. Our team partnered with the Maryland Stadium Authority, Baltimore City Public Schools, & JRS Architects to provide pre-construction & construction services to this historic building.

This project renovates the original historic building and demolishes several later, outdated additions, replacing them with two new additions. Construction began in August 2016, and was completed for the start of school in August 2018. Key features include 72,044 sf of renovated space including the Media Center and CTE Labs, with another 63,852 sf of new construction. The new portion of the building contains a state-of-the-art Gymnasium, Art & Music Classrooms, and a Collaborative Learning Stair.

A dedicated entrance for community space leads to 1,980 sf featuring a large meeting room, career readiness room, food pantry, and a laundry center. In addition, there are two new greenhouses available for student use.

Thoughtful design allows for the building to maximize daylight in instructional areas, including the new collaborative learning areas, while there is a clear circulation path for wayfinding and security.

The renovated facility will gracefully transform an iconic building in the Hampden neighborhood into a true 21st century school.

Basilica of the Assumption – Adoration Chapel

Prior to its restoration, the Adoration Chapel below the sanctuary of the Basilica of the Assumption was just one of a number of small rooms. Though certainly a sacred space for contemplation and prayer, it presented less than an inviting space for worship.  Until a fisherman at Loch Raven reservoir “caught” a most unusual item – an antique Gothic monstrance – which he gifted to the Archdiocese of Baltimore. This restored monstrance sits beneath the octagonal baldachino with its white Corinthian columns and brilliant blue tiles at the altar within the restored Adoration Chapel.

Belying its small size, restoration of the chapel involved a tremendous amount of work.  CAM’s forces completed virtually all of the work themselves with the exception of the new marble flooring, construction of the altar and installation of the new lighting.  The plaster arches were modified and restored, the brick flooring removed and the substrate leveled for installation of the marble flooring. The wrought iron gate was designed, custom fabricated and installed to provide a distinctive entrance into the chapel.  Previously exposed conduits were hidden behind new drywall. A new railing mimicking that of the sanctuary above was installed to separate the nave of the chapel from its seating and new millwork was installed throughout to provide the sense of history that a chapel within America’s first cathedral warrants.

Though very small in size, the renovation of this chapel presented challenges not often seen in a project of this magnitude.  The Basilica above remained operational throughout the project, necessitating careful coordination to deliver new materials and dispose of the debris, and noise had to be kept to a minimum so as not to disrupt the frequent masses within the sanctuary above.  The work of CAM’s Field Superintendent was often reviewed by the on-site priests and the Monsignor who, after living through two restorations of the Basilica itself, had become quite adept at scrutinizing the quality of workmanship.

In his dedication, Archbishop William Lori acknowledged the anonymous fisherman whose gift inspired the restoration of the chapel where each day the faithful come to pray for priestly and religious vocations.

Upon its completion, the new Adoration Chapel was dedicated to the great work of Monsignor Arthur Valenzano, vicar of the Basilica, who had originally established the small adoration chapel, but sadly has since passed away after the dedication of the project.

Glenmount Middle School

Project included a complete renovation of the existing 55,000 square feet school and construction of a 15,000 square foot addition to this historic building, originally constructed in 1929 and included in the National Historic Registry.

Interior renovations included new mechanical and electrical systems as well as the addition of several new classrooms, labs and support facilities. The renovation also included installation of a state of the art CAT 5 fiber optics computer data & TV network.

Great care was taken on the exterior renovations to preserve the details of this classic building. The signature cupola was removed and completely refurbished prior to its re-installation. The addition was designed to complement the historic building and provide an additional 15,000 square feet of academic space.

Site renovations involved the construction of new parking lots, installation of new landscaping and playground construction.

Rombro Loft Condominiums

Converting a historic, six story, inner city office building into seventeen condominium apartment units presents many challenges; particularly when the first floor of such a structure remains occupied as a functioning dialysis clinic throughout construction.

When the building was once home to the Baltimore Office of the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms, complete with lightweight concrete floor topping, surveillance equipment and reinforced drywall partitions the task becomes even more challenging.

CAM Construction was employed as the construction manager at risk for the project and aided in keeping the tight budget controlled, constructed many of the units with loft areas, high level finishes and appliances.

Storefront windows were replaced to provide operable window units with appropriate profiles and the common areas were all completed without interruption to the ongoing work of the clinic. The award winning building provides affordable housing to Baltimore residents and is another outstanding effort for the West Side Redevelopment of the city.

Roland Park Elementary/ Middle School #233

This project included the complete renovation and major additions to the historic 1925 public school building. Great care was taken in the planning and construction of this 125,000 square foot project in that it was continuously occupied throughout the renovation.

Extensive use of temporary barriers and pedestrian flow controls were required.   A large amount of hazardous material abatement was included in the contract.

Also included was a complete floor by floor finish and equipment modifications and complete mechanical and electrical system replacement and upgrades

Park Terminal Garage

Converting the 1899 70,000 sq. ft. former street car barn in to the Baltimore City Utility Maintenance Division Headquarters presented many challenges. All interior concrete framing and roof structure were removed leaving only the historic brick exterior walls. The existing streetcar maintenance tunnels were in-filled with concrete at a depth of 10′ to create the new structural footings.

The historic brick walls were braced until the new wide bay structural steel system was erected and the joists installed to carry the new flat metal roofing panels. These 108′ long roof panels were delivered to the tightly congested site at the corner of Fulton Ave and Druid Park Dr.  Two cranes were required to erect each panel. The existing stair towers were extensively re-worked, and a large amount of masonry restoration and lead paint abatement work was completed while the building remained fully occupied. Two stone belt cornices, stone parapets, accents and sills were fully restored to compliment  the restored brick masonry walls.

There were many challenges associated with working in an occupied urban environment. This project included complete restroom/locker room renovations, installation of new mechanical systems using air handlers, steam unit heaters,  steam lines and forced sanitary piping.

Electrical work included renovation or replacement of the power distribution systems, security and fire systems, public address systems and new light fixtures, switching and receptacles.

An extensive, elaborate shelving system, remotely and manually controlled overhead doors, dock levelers and window restoration also were installed. Work was completed ahead of schedule without interruption to the Division’s operations.