The Lofts at Stehli Silk Mill

Originally built in 1897, the 11-acre Mill complex comprises six (6) distinct buildings that employed 2,100 female textile workers at its peak, and it is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Most of the structures are three stories tall, with the main structure (bordering Martha Ave.) spanning over 900 linear feet, making it the longest building east of the Mississippi when it was constructed. The exterior elevation is characterized by a strong series of brick piers that correlate with the close beam and column spacing (7’0”OC), which produces a 300 lbs/sqft floor load capacity. Tall (9’0”) windows accentuate the façade and are woven between the piers to provide maximum ambient light, as was customary with factories of
that era.

CAM is in the process of converting this mill into 165 loft-style apartments, consisting primarily of one-bedroom units with a mix of two-bedroom units and studios, with occupancy scheduled for January 2024. Additionally, a resident clubhouse/common area is planned for the old women’s cafeteria, which is a single-story structure with a clerestory and exposed steel truss roof framing system. Ancillary structures related to the former boiler plant will be utilized to provide amenities such as a fitness center and brew pub open to the public, as well as leasable space for some smaller retail/office users. The interiors will have a combination of restored materials (ie: wood flooring) and brush blasted exposed brick walls and beams, as well as all new partitioning throughout. All new electrical service, and HVAC systems will be implemented, along with necessary low voltage systems. We take a minimalist approach to our design to allow as much of the original building features to show through. There are 1,400+ windows of all shapes, sizes & styles that CAM is replacing according to NPS guidelines.

Montebello Elementary/Middle School

The Montebello Elementary/Middle School project encompassed a 74,000 sf systemic renovation and complete interior gut of a historic school property, restoring the two existing buildings back to shell condition and then constructing all new improvements throughout. There was both a historic restoration component on the exterior of the existing structures, as well as a compatible newly constructed “cafeterorium” wing (20,000 sf) which had to be nestled within this confined site and communicate seamlessly between multiple distinct floor elevations, with the help of a brand new ADA stair tower.

One of the main goals of the project was to undo a series of inconsistent, incompatible renovation efforts over the decades, while highlighting the original architectural features of the building through a variety of restoration and reconstruction efforts:

  • new architectural shingled roofs
  • rounded architectural bronze gutter and downspout system to match the historic copper material salvaged on the field house
  • basketweave masonry restoration and cleaning of the architectural stone, steps, columns, balustrade, needlepointing, and school name engraving
  • replacement of over 300 existing windows with aluminum clad window systems to replicate the style and light pattern of the remaining historic windows
  • capture traditional stone archways and architectural features at the entry canopy through the second floor windows of breakout areas as well as a classroom and “wholeness” room
  • gym renovation repurposed existing stage façade, brought out the elegance of the arched windows, and dropped a drywall ceiling beneath the formerly exposed girder trusses to conceal new HVAC and improve acoustics for the space’s theatrical/assembly functions.
  • Renovated internal stairwell in the rear, with sweeping views overlooking Lake Montebello
  • Expansive city views out of collaborative learning areas as well as classrooms, overlooking 33rd street toward City College, the old Memorial Stadium site, and row homes rising up the hillside towards the horizon

This job contained a few unique features for a PreK-8th school, such as a locker room, hybrid library-media center with bulkhead accent lighting, and a video production studio with greenscreen, display mounting racks, and hookups for an iMac editing booth. One core component of this job was the construction of a $2 million state of the art kitchen with large walk-in refrigerator-freezer boxes, steam/convection ovens, stovetop, boiling hot water vats, warmers, automatic dishwashing equipment, and two individual serving lines to serve the brand new cafeteria (which doubles as a multipurpose room). Tall ceilings, architectural accent lighting, acoustical panels, and an extensive sound system make this space suitable for performances, community meetings, and other events. Finally, CAM executed the construction of a very difficult outdoor learning area between the new and historic buildings, installing planter beds, wide concrete seating, and staircases for students to congregate and classes to be held outdoors in good weather. We had to contend with a ten-foot elevation change spanning a distance of less than twenty feet within this newly formed courtyard.

By no means was this an easy undertaking for the A&E team or CAM, as this site presented a number of inherent obstacles given existing conditions. Challenging features included steep slopes (50’ drop from Harford Road to Curran Drive), outdoor learning areas and playgrounds wedged between structures, inserting state-of-the art mechanical equipment within restricted spaces (former boiler rooms), and a bulkhead pocket detail around all historic window openings (to preserve original dimensions, enhance natural light/views, while concealing new ceiling cassettes within modern drop ceiling systems). Thoughtful sequencing and stocking of materials in the building was necessary to sustain progress despite having a single access lane for supplies and crane mobilization.

The Lofts at Pontiac Mills

 

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate, historic, textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom brand of cloth. Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex, along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and it will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

The Ridge at Ruxton – Subdivision & Private Residence

Historic restoration and an adaptive re-use project of a registered Historic property, were the focal points of The Ridge. This late nineteenth century Beaux Artes Mansion was designed by Baldwin & Pennington and was built by John Stack & Sons. Originally a 28-room residence that was later turned into a school for handicapped children, CAM returned The Ridge to a private residence and won numerous awards for our efforts.

This project required removal of lead-based paint and asbestos, installation of a heating system, and the design and installation of the home’s first air conditioning system, which were installed with no disruption to the historic interior fabric of the home. The project also included restoration of the plaster walls, ceilings, and crown moldings, restoration of the interior shutters, and a complete restoration of a two-story tower, replete with brick, terra-cotta, metal cornices, lead coated copper, slate roofing, etc.

Pontiac Mills Commercial Space

The Pontiac Mills Development is the adaptive reuse of more than 20 separate historic textile mill buildings into a mixed-use complex comprised of both office/retail and residential rental apartments. This historic textile mill complex was the original producer for Fruit of the Loom textile and garments.

Approximately 135 apartments and 50,000 SF of office/retail space will be developed within the existing mill complex along the banks of the Pawtuxet River in Warwick, Rhode Island.

Work on the development began in 2016 and will encompass the renovation of approximately 200,000 SF, with first occupancy in 2018 and all phases completed by 2019/2020. The estimated cost for the entire project is $35,000,000.00. The project has been approved as an historic structure/complex from both the State of Rhode Island and the National Park Service. Pontiac Mills, originally built in 1863, has been declared a Nationally Registered Historic District, and will utilize various state and federal tax credit programs.

Robert Poole Building

The Robert Poole Building is home to The Academy for College and Career Exploration (ACCE) and The Independence School, a project within the 21st Century School Buildings Plan. Our team partnered with the Maryland Stadium Authority, Baltimore City Public Schools, & JRS Architects to provide pre-construction & construction services to this historic building.

This project renovates the original historic building and demolishes several later, outdated additions, replacing them with two new additions. Construction began in August 2016, and was completed for the start of school in August 2018. Key features include 72,044 sf of renovated space including the Media Center and CTE Labs, with another 63,852 sf of new construction. The new portion of the building contains a state-of-the-art Gymnasium, Art & Music Classrooms, and a Collaborative Learning Stair.

A dedicated entrance for community space leads to 1,980 sf featuring a large meeting room, career readiness room, food pantry, and a laundry center. In addition, there are two new greenhouses available for student use.

Thoughtful design allows for the building to maximize daylight in instructional areas, including the new collaborative learning areas, while there is a clear circulation path for wayfinding and security.

The renovated facility will gracefully transform an iconic building in the Hampden neighborhood into a true 21st century school.

Basilica of the Assumption – Adoration Chapel & Exhibit

Prior to its restoration, the Adoration Chapel below the sanctuary of the Basilica of the Assumption was just one of a number of small rooms. Though certainly a sacred space for contemplation and prayer, the chapel presented less than an inviting space for worship; however, a fisherman at Loch Raven reservoir “caught” a most unusual item – an antique Gothic monstrance – which he gifted to the Archdiocese of Baltimore. This restored monstrance sits beneath the octagonal baldachino, with its white Corinthian columns and brilliant blue tiles at the altar within the restored Adoration Chapel.

Belying its small size, restoration of the chapel involved a tremendous amount of work.  CAM’s forces completed virtually all of the work themselves, with the exception of the new marble flooring, construction of the altar, and installation of the new lighting.  The plaster arches were modified and restored, the brick flooring removed, and the substrate leveled for installation of the marble flooring. The wrought iron gate was designed, custom fabricated, and installed to provide a distinctive entrance into the chapel.  Previously exposed conduits were hidden behind new drywall. A new railing mimicking that of the sanctuary above was installed to separate the nave of the chapel from its seating, and new millwork was installed throughout to provide the sense of history that a chapel within America’s first cathedral warrants.

Though very small in size, the renovation of this chapel presented challenges not often seen in a project of this magnitude.  The Basilica above remained operational throughout the project, necessitating careful coordination to deliver new materials and dispose of the debris, and noise had to be kept to a minimum so as not to disrupt the frequent masses within the sanctuary above.  The work of CAM’s Field Superintendent was often reviewed by the on-site priests and the Monsignor who, after living through two restorations of the Basilica itself, had become quite adept at scrutinizing the quality of workmanship.

In his dedication, Archbishop William Lori acknowledged the anonymous fisherman whose gift inspired the restoration of the chapel, where the faithful come to pray for priestly and religious vocations each day.

Upon its completion, the new Adoration Chapel was dedicated to the great work of Monsignor Arthur Valenzano, vicar of the Basilica, who had originally established the small adoration chapel, but sadly has since passed away after the dedication of the project.

Rombro Loft Condominiums

Converting a historic, six-story, inner city office building into 17 condominium apartment units presents many challenges, particularly when the first floor of such a structure remains occupied as a functioning dialysis clinic throughout construction.

When the building was once home to the Baltimore Office of the Bureau of Tobacco and Firearms, complete with lightweight concrete floor topping, surveillance equipment, and reinforced drywall partitions, the task becomes even more challenging.

CAM Construction was employed as the Construction Manager at Risk for the project and aided in keeping the tight budget controlled and constructed many of the units with loft areas, high-level finishes, and appliances.

Storefront windows were replaced to provide operable window units with appropriate profiles, and the common areas were all completed without interruption to the ongoing work of the clinic. The award-winning building provides affordable housing to Baltimore residents and is another outstanding effort for the West Side Redevelopment of the city.

1820 Lancaster Street – Union Box Co. Building

CAM Construction provided construction management and design/build services to Mason Dixon Capital Management for Lancaster Square in Fells Point. Savings of over 5% were achieved by utilizing the Construction Management Guaranteed Maximum Price delivery method. CAM utilized a value engineering process that permitted the project to proceed on a fast track basis to meet the developer’s needs.

The Lancaster Square renovation consisted of a group of five separate structures originally built in the 1880s and varying significantly in construction materials and floor plate elevations. The main building, The Union Box Co., is a timber-framed, three-story, 16,000-square foot brick warehouse. The other buildings are a two-story, steel-framed building, a two-story steel- and wood-framed building, and a 3-story brick townhouse.

Among the main challenges to this project was integration of the five structures into a single cohesive development while completely renovating the existing structures. The project called for major restoration including extensive masonry cleaning and re-pointing as well as cleaning and sealing the wood beams. The integration of the five structures unified 12 different roof elevations all of which were re-roofed and to which several large wood decks were added. Approximately 120 historic windows were replaced as part of the renovation.

Both a new five-story and three-story elevator shaft were installed within the existing footprint of the building. The project also added three stair towers, two of which were steel, and one was a concrete scissor stair.

As a part of the redevelopment, CAM constructed a three-story, light gauge addition between two irregularly shaped brick walls to integrate the structures. The project added another three-story addition that provides space for 10 luxury apartments atop the existing two-story structure.

At the main entrance a railroad motif with asphalt brick pavers, solid maple ties and stainless steel tracks lead visitors and residents from Lancaster Street to inside the Union Box Co. building. Once inside, the building glass walls seamlessly interface with the large wood timbers and provide aisles and office space while maintaining the historical character of the building. The apartment entrance is accessed through a large teak door flanked by tubular steel frames with stainless steel rods and an illuminated barrel vault canopy awning. The teak door gate is electronically interlocked with a secondary all-aluminum entrance at the other end of the courtyard, providing security for the apartment residents.